Community garden: Giving thanks

community garden

looking down at my cauliflower, cabbage, and broccoli on 5.30.13

I want to make comments about the community garden at the next city council meeting, so I’m reflecting on where the praise should go. >My husband thinks the praise goes to me. That’s what I’ve overheard him tell people — that I single-handedly created the program. As if.<

The winner of the community garden program is us, the citizens who were blessed with the ten plots. The making of the garden was the work of many people, and I’d like to recognize them now.

Thank you to this free online grid paper. I am able to plant crops that I never dreamed of having. By having more space than my yard allows, I feel like going wild. But I have to carefully plan and restrain my whims and be practical. This paper works like a charm. I plot the crops and made sure the grid was sized right for my writing. Store bought paper wasn’t working for me. I’m not a “tiny writer.”

Thanks to Cubed Foot Gardening by Chris Bird — perhaps the only impulse book buy that I ever made. I remember the purchase vividly (it was a date night, which almost always ends at a book store), and I thankful for it. I’ve used it as a reference book for eleven years.

Thanks to the gardeners who keep all the participants up to date with Facebook. Our Facebook group is open so anyone can join and learn about our program, but the contributors seem to be gardeners who were awarded a plot. Which makes sense, since it’s our skin in the game. We invested time and money into our plots. So when the creek rises and we’re scared, at least one of us will venture down for a report and maybe a photo.

Thank you to the city staff. They chose a very visible place for the plots which has drawn the public’s attention. They built a water tower for us and left piles of mulch and compost for our use. We get quick responses to our messages, like when we asked about fencing.

Thanks also to bloggers, like this one. I get ideas and encouragement from regular people.

Where do you keep a garden?

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